SONR swim coach communicator

SONR swim coach communicator

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What to Know

SONR is a compact disc-shaped radio receiver that can be placed anywhere on the swimmer’s head — under the swimming cap or on the goggles using a special included clip. The coach talks into a regular walkie-talkie while the swimmers hear the voice in real-time, even when their ears are underwater.

What to Know

SONR is a compact disc-shaped radio receiver that can be placed anywhere on the swimmer’s head — under the swimming cap or on the goggles using a special included clip. The coach talks into a regular walkie-talkie while the swimmers hear the voice in real-time, even when their ears are underwater.

Story

It is twenty seventeen. The founder Dmitri Voloshin prepares for the swim by working out with a coach in the pool. As he gets the task, he begins to swim and hears only fragments of sentences. The sound of water and constant immersion of the head in water make it difficult to hear the coach’s voice. Then a thought arises: “It would be great to have a device that would allow me to hear the coach’s voice even when my ears are underwater. The coach would have a walkie-talkie, and I would have a device that would allow me to adjust my technique right during training.”
Everything always starts with a thought, and we turn it into reality.

This is how Sonr was born. It was born to overcome the main obstacle in swim coaching — the difficulty in real-time communication from the coach to the swimmer. Until today, the coach was forced to shout, make signs, or even wait for the swimmer to finish the run and only then correct the mistakes. This leads to precious training time being wasted on waiting and repeated mistakes, making the training process substantially less efficient. Thanks to SONR, the coach can now communicate to the swimmer in real-time. Loud and clear. This allows instant and precise correction of mistakes without shouting, waiting, or any counterproductive tension between the coach and the swimmer.

Creator

Dmitri Voloshin is the founder of SONR Inc, an entrepreneur from Eastern Europe, and more than a professional swimmer. Dmitri crossed the Bosphorus, became a national freediving champion, participated in the OceanMan swimming ultramarathon, crossed the Strait of Gibraltar, and in July 2014, won the title of IronMan in Zurich.

Description

SONR is the world’s smallest bone-conducting receiver. It’s unsinkable, has an antibacterial coating, complies with the IPX8 waterproof standard, and is designed for real-time coaching. Using just one walkie-talkie, the coach can train teams up to 30 swimmers wearing SONRs communicating to the whole team or each swimmer or custom group. SONR even features a metronome helping the swimmer build a consistent pace.

SONR is made for any kind of swim or water sports training, being especially relevant in the open water given the safety concerns. SONR helps prevent difficult situations in open water by ensuring permanent communication to the swimmers as it provides a stable signal reception up to 300 meters away from the coach and 1 meter underwater.

Thanks to its sleek and lightweight design, SONR looks great on a swimmer’s head and, after just a few minutes of training, the swimmer forgets about the presence of SONR, leaving them in direct contact with the coach fully focused on the training.

Story

It is twenty seventeen. The founder Dmitri Voloshin prepares for the swim by working out with a coach in the pool. As he gets the task, he begins to swim and hears only fragments of sentences. The sound of water and constant immersion of the head in water make it difficult to hear the coach’s voice. Then a thought arises: “It would be great to have a device that would allow me to hear the coach’s voice even when my ears are underwater. The coach would have a walkie-talkie, and I would have a device that would allow me to adjust my technique right during training.”
Everything always starts with a thought, and we turn it into reality.

This is how Sonr was born. It was born to overcome the main obstacle in swim coaching — the difficulty in real-time communication from the coach to the swimmer. Until today, the coach was forced to shout, make signs, or even wait for the swimmer to finish the run and only then correct the mistakes. This leads to precious training time being wasted on waiting and repeated mistakes, making the training process substantially less efficient. Thanks to SONR, the coach can now communicate to the swimmer in real-time. Loud and clear. This allows instant and precise correction of mistakes without shouting, waiting, or any counterproductive tension between the coach and the swimmer.

Creator

Dmitri Voloshin is the founder of SONR Inc, an entrepreneur from Eastern Europe, and more than a professional swimmer. Dmitri crossed the Bosphorus, became a national freediving champion, participated in the OceanMan swimming ultramarathon, crossed the Strait of Gibraltar, and in July 2014, won the title of IronMan in Zurich.

Description

SONR is the world’s smallest bone-conducting receiver. It’s unsinkable, has an antibacterial coating, complies with the IPX8 waterproof standard, and is designed for real-time coaching. Using just one walkie-talkie, the coach can train teams up to 30 swimmers wearing SONRs communicating to the whole team or each swimmer or custom group. SONR even features a metronome helping the swimmer build a consistent pace.

SONR is made for any kind of swim or water sports training, being especially relevant in the open water given the safety concerns. SONR helps prevent difficult situations in open water by ensuring permanent communication to the swimmers as it provides a stable signal reception up to 300 meters away from the coach and 1 meter underwater.

Thanks to its sleek and lightweight design, SONR looks great on a swimmer’s head and, after just a few minutes of training, the swimmer forgets about the presence of SONR, leaving them in direct contact with the coach fully focused on the training.

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